Election comments

It’s kind of strange but in 2006 there were a fairly large number of drive by commentators to this blog during the election cycle.  The readership also spiked significantly.    But this time around, there are almost no comments – except for regulars.

I wonder why?  I have requested to see my traffic to see if readers are up or down.

Since 2006, Twitter and Facebook have emerged and maybe that’s where people go for their daily political dose and commentary.  

I haven’t commented that much on the election here – mainly because I have three columns a week in the TJ for the election period.

But I wonder if there is a broader shift away from blogs to the micro-blog Twitter and the relatively closed social network Facebook?

Or it could be just this blog.   It is interesting to note that NBpolitico has very few comments, The Bruce report few, and several others very few as well.

Maybe people are a) less chatty, b) there’s less anger around – remember the tone of the conversation in 2006 at least here, c) moved to Twitter and Facebook.

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3 Responses to Election comments

  1. Blog comments have shifted to Twitter, FB and services like Posterous and Tumblr over the last year or so. Twitter is now one of the main referrers of visitors to my blog.

  2. anonymoose says:

    I’d have expected more hits, what with the notoriety of being in the TJ. People are reading those, I’ve heard your column mentioned a time or 2 in office political discussion.

    This election has been extremely depressing to me, I think we’re pooched no matter who wins.

    I suspect you’re too polite and/or constrained to say, but I’d love to get your opinion on the quality of the Times & Transcript election coverage.

  3. mikel says:

    I’d agree with Richard that at least right NOW, there is very little substantive as far as the social media goes. I’ve gone to the CBC site which has a special ‘blog’ or site for each nomination, and there are very few comments, none at some, and many are fairly nasty.

    There are almost NO facebook sites and the trouble has been the same as before, that apart from party members, NBers are simply not engaged. The two main parties have helped spur that on, neither of them has anything that can remotely be called a ‘platform’. CBC is filled with ideologues who simply hate the liberals, not realizing the conservatives aren’t any different.

    And with no real organization there is no viable alternative, so the three other parties will simply guarantee a mismatched majority.

    Contrast that with 2006-you had bernard lord who had some very real economic policies-even if they were bad-you had the legislative democracy commission which was going to front a referendum. Then you had the liberals who were riding the waves of a hot topic-public insurance. Now, with NBPower, people really have no idea whats going on, and Lepreau is turning into such a mess that its doubtful people really see ANY party turning it around.

    We’ve seen some very bizarre polls, with few details, so nobody really knows what anybody thinks, and since people can say just about anything online-they DO, which has made it even more confusing.

    So I really think with so much disappointment at the ‘leadership level’ that a lot of people are turning their attention to their local races, at least thats what a lot of people I’ve spoken with have said.

    But lets be realistic, there was never really a LOT of online activity at NB sites-heck one of the reasons I come to the sites is that often there is simply NO debate, and I think criticism is more welcome than silence. But also, at a lot of places those who DO debate have gotten more and more personal and nasty. This is unfortunate because it means dialogue is controlled by the screamers, and heaven forbid the public act as badly as our elected officials in the house.

    What IS unfortunate is that its too bad there wasn’t at least a referendum on PR, that at least gets people more excited about voting-making a decision is always different than simply voting for some guy you’ll never hear from after election day.

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