Canada and the world

I was reading a bit about the history of this city last night – Sao Paulo.  Canadian companies were actively involved in building the energy infrastructure and other big projects.  I suspect you would similar stories in other Latin American countries.  Now, it seems, with a few exception, Canadian companeis are all US focused.

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5 Responses to Canada and the world

  1. mikel says:

    Not even close, in south america canadian mining companies are VERY well known, and thats not a good thing. Likewise, Indonesia has always been a very heavy trading partner that had extensive links with canadian companies. How else could you get the RCMP to arrest protestors BEFORE the visit of the Prime Minister of Indonesia-one of the most brutal dictators in the world. Check out “The Black Book of Canadian Foreign Policy” which charts the governments foreign policy as being not much different from the US’, namely, a backup for canadian corporate ventures abroad. While canadians have a certain reputation in europe, that reputation is FAR different in the developing world.

  2. Anonymous says:

    @mikel
    Not even close, Mikel.

    “…BEFORE the visit of the Prime Minister of Indonesia-one of the most brutal dictators in the world”
    >First, Indonesia has a presidential system. Second, Indonesia is now the world’s third-largest democracy. Is it just my impression or every time you make a comment about a developing country it comes tainted with a bit of prejudice?

    “While canadians have a certain reputation in europe, that reputation is FAR different in the developing world.”
    >I don’t know where you get this kind of information (Google?). You definitely need to travel a little more (Note: staying in resorts doesn’t count)
    You are probably right about the mining sector, but the truth is that there aren’t many saints in that area (it doesn’t matter where the company comes from). Another truth is that, unfortunately, not many Canadian companies are known abroad. And when people in the developing world find out that a given company is Canadian, the usual comment is: “Really? I thought that it was an American company!” (Do you want a test? David could randomly ask 10 people in Sao Paulo where they think RIM comes from – and share the result with us)

  3. Samonymous says:

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  4. mikel says:

    That isnt’ prejudice, just go read any number of books on Indonesia and canadian mining. Remember the Bre-X scandal-that was all Indonesia.It doesnt’ matter what a country calls itself, Mexico is a ‘large democracy’ yet pretty much runs like a kangaroo court. Indonesia is consistently cited for its human rights abuses which are just brutal-just go look them up. As for the visit, go read “Pepper in our Eyes-teh APEC affair” about the arrest of protestors before the Prime Minister (oops, President, sorry) visit.
    Just because other places are bad doesn’t mean you don’t call a spade a spade. Farmers in India who have met canadian mining companies know full well where the company is from. It’s true that most people in most parts of the world probably know NOTHING about Canada, but obviously I’m not referring to them. Canada’s impact in the developing world is primarily resource based companies, they have poor records here, and worse records in the countries they operate. Most of the highest rated companies in canada are insurance, finance, and public companies-they don’t operate in the developing world except to fund operations. People in other parts of the world are MUCH better informed about their political economy than canadians, and when companies come to town, the first thing they do is find out where they are from.

  5. mikel says:

    For some more interesting reading on Canada’s foreign policy check out papers on Canada’s relation with Indonesia during the invasion and genocide of East Timor. Not a lot of people are aware of Canada’s integral relationship with Suharto, a mass murderer of millions. Trudeau was sucking up to Castro while helping canadian companies do business in one of the most brutal military dictatorships in the world.

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