Activist journalism at its finest

Al Hogan must be a case study for journalism classes everywhere.  It’s fascinating to watch.  The Times & Transcript has featured over two dozen stories about tax reform in New Brunswick and the central theme of virtually everyone of them (usually with front page zingers) is how bad increasing the HST would be. 

By contrast, the Telegraph-Journal has run a number of stories on the topic, covering it from all angles.  The Daily Gleaner has also run stories as has CBC online and even Rogers – all relatively balanced.

But old Al Hogan’s gotta get out the hammer.  Whether it’s toll highways, cath labs or HST increases, if he ain’t happy, ain’t no one happy.  You would think the Chamber, the CFIB, the Conseil Economique and everyone else is dead set against the HST increase.

This guy has got to be a case study.

Last point on this.  If Al Hogan had any even basic understanding of economic development he would realize that tax policies that encourage more production here is the only real long term way to increase consumption. So if he is really concerned about the retail sector in New Brunswick he would promote tax policies that lead to more job creation which will lead to more aggregate retail spending rather than tax policies that try to tweak out a few more dollars of spending from the existing base of consumers.

I think it’s more basic that than.  He doesn’t want to spend 15% on his purchases and he is welcome to that opinion.  I don’t particularly want to spend 15% more on my purchases either.  But if I have to spend 2% more on purchases as part of a credible plan by government to turn around the economic funk that New Brunswick has been in more or less for a long time – I’m up for that.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Activist journalism at its finest

  1. Anon says:

    “But if I have to spend 2% more on purchases as part of a credible plan by government to turn around the economic funk that New Brunswick has been in more or less for a long time – I’m up for that.”

    I think many of us would be willing to contribute more tax if indeed it was channeled to sustainable economic developmeent rather than political goodies that will do little except perhaps re-elect the government in power.

    The problem is, the government is generally reckless with our tax dollars (eg $60M bailout of a Caisse branch) and has not earned our trust and respect. Furthermore, the majority of tax payers are failing to hold governments accountable for meaningful policy and action. Case in point, recent governments have gotten elected on toll highway and auto insurance policies, not economic or education policy. No sign of that changing, the recent byelection had access to high speed internet as the major issue.

Comments are closed.