Back in the saddle again

The blog is back online. There are a few posts to catch up on.

Shipley has an interesting story this morning on McKenna talking up Atl. Canada economic development.

Citing interprovincial trade barriers, McKenna says:

The former premier pointed out a sign at the New Brunswick-Nova Scotia border that highlighted the ridiculousness of some trade barriers. The sign banned New Brunswick bees from crossing into Nova Scotia. “They bees do not know this,” he said.

I would take that one step further. When you are driving on the Trans Canada Highway from Nova Scotia to New Brunswick, you never see a kilometre distance sign to Moncton (or vice versa). You see “New Brunswick border”. It’s a small thing but it goes to the heart of the lack of cooperation for over a century. NS had a beer deal with Quebec and it didn’t want to do one with NB. Moncton window manufacturers – with cheaper prices – couldn’t get contracts in Nova Scotia 30 years ago. A simple sign saying xx kilometres to Moncton or Halifax is impossible because of a ‘border’.

I have said this ad nauseum. The Atlantic Provinces are reluctant to cooperate because of the slight possibility that one might get ahead of the other. Heaven forbid.

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0 Responses to Back in the saddle again

  1. nbt says:

    I think the two points that stick out to me were:

    A region-wide effort to lower corporate taxes and offset some lost revenue with consumption taxes;

    Changes to to employment insurance to ensure the region’s workforce is not under utilized.

    Both changes, I believe, would bring forth transformational and attitudinal change on the ground in Atlantic Canada. Something that has to be changed before any of the other measures are implemented.

    As McKenna once said, we have to restore that “can do” attitude that once made us a prosperous and proud region. Right now, we’re a “defeated” region hooked on government handouts and social assistance. We need to change that.

  2. nbt says:

    I think the two points that stick out to me were:

    A region-wide effort to lower corporate taxes and offset some lost revenue with consumption taxes;

    Changes to to employment insurance to ensure the region’s workforce is not under utilized.

    Both changes, I believe, would bring forth transformational and attitudinal change on the ground in Atlantic Canada. Something that has to be changed before any of the other measures are implemented.

    As McKenna once said, we have to restore that “can do” attitude that once made us a prosperous and proud region. Right now, we’re a “defeated” region hooked on government handouts and social assistance (seasonal work). We need to change that.